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Advanced Products Group becomes Canadian supplier of Weather Resistant LCD TVS in the restaurant industry

  • Filed under: News on 28 Nov

APG Supplies Outdoor TVS to Jack Astor’s

Mississauga, On – November 17, 2008 – Today, Advanced Products Group (APG) is pleased to announce a distribution agreement with AQUiVO to supply their range of weather resistant LCD screens across Canada. APG is also the leading distributor for SunBriteTV, the all weather outdoor LCD television. As part of this announcement, APG announced that Jack Astor’s Bar and Grill in Toronto has purchased four 47” outdoor AQUiVO LCD TVs.

“The addition of the outdoors LCD TVs keeps our patios open longer, generates more revenue and keeps our guests coming back, “said Andrea Jacks, general manager and partner, Jacks Astor’s Bar & Grill. “Simply put, having LCD TVs that are weatherproof keep our guests happy. They are a great boost to our business.” 

“Adding LCD TVs is a simple way to generate more revenue for your restaurant on game and event nights. Bar and restaurant owners are thrilled with the fact that they have now extra seats generating much more revenue now that the TVs are outside,” said Andrew Salamon, General Manager, APG. “Statistics prove that patrons will stay longer, eat and drink more on the patio if they are entertained via these TV’s. And customers experience all the excitement and quality with outdoor TVs – now, there is no need just gather at the bar.”

Both APG distributed LCD TV lines, are ideal for a variety of outdoor situations, including patios, pub gardens, shopping centres, public transport, outdoor marketing events, and other environments that require specialist, hardwearing screens, such as spas or swimming pools.

The pricing on different screen sizes range from $1,900 to $35,000 (CDN).“For events, concerts, patios, sports stadiums and more, our line-up of weather resistant LCDs, from AQUiVO and SunBrite, adds excitement to a venue or event,” adds Salamon. “You can entertain your guests outdoors in any weather condition – even during our icy Canadian winter. If you have the event or venue, APG has the outdoor screens for any situation and weather condition.”

AQUiVO LCD TV’s are constructed with fully sealed, lightweight aluminum frames and a toughened glass front, the of weather resistant LCD screens are perfect for outdoor use at a variety of events or permanent locations, such as pubs, bars, sports venues, and many other applications.  The AQUiVO is capable of enduring a variety of weather conditions, including rain, humidity and dust. The LCD TV’s also ensure superb brightness, contrast and colour quality. The AQUiVO screens come in five different sizes, 42”, 47”, 52, 57” and 70”.

SunBrite TV’s all-weather outdoor LCD televisions are designed for permanent outdoor residential and commercial installation. Ideal for Canadian winter – internal thermostatically controlled heater protects the TV in temperatures as low as minus 31 degrees Celsius. The corrosion-resistant, powder-coated aluminum exterior protects the internal TV components from rain, dirt, insects and other outdoor elements. The SunBrite TV comes in three different sizes, 23”, 32” and 46”.

 Weather Resistant LCD at Jack Astors Toronto Aquivo installed at Jack Astors TorontoOutdoor TVs at Jack Astor’s Toronto

About Advanced Products Group

Advanced Products Group are experts in creating the right presentation environment and offer the most successful design and implementation of high-end, high-impact display solutions that provide maximum impact to exhibition stands, boardrooms, award shows, conferences and live events. For more information please visit www.apgdisplays.com

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SMART Boards: Revolutionizing the World of Education

The latest interactive, multimedia tools SMART Boards are helping to revolutionize educational establishments throughout Canada.

Bizzarely, even though the technology was created in Canada nearly 15 years ago, whiteboards here in Canada are only just catching on. In England, for instance, there is a mandate that whiteboards (a version of the SMART Boards) should be deployed in every classroom by 2009.

The technology is highly adaptable and it can be used from kindergarten right through to post-secondary education. Sharp-eyed viewers may even have spotted the use of SMART Board technology which often appears in the hit TV series CSI to showcase suspects.

What is the learning curve for teachers?

In short, low threshold and high ceiling. Teachers can start using it the same way that they use their blackboard except that, at the end of the day, the lesson can be saved and not erased. This can then be used to help absent students or for self-reflection.

A workshop to demonstrate the terrific benefits that the whiteboard technology offers was held recently in Peterborough, Ontario by Toronto-based audio visual specialists Advanced Inc. as part of their PD (Professional Development Series) showcase tour.

Join the whiteboard revolution with Advanced Inc.

The SMART Board interactive whiteboard is used to teach over 18 million students in more than 600,000 classrooms in more than 100 countries worldwide. If you want to know how you can join the SMART whiteboard revolution, contact Advanced Inc. now or call  (800) 436-6239.

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SMART Boards: Changing the Way Students Learn and Teachers Teach

It’s official. The SMART Board and interactive media tool are changing the way students learn and how teachers teach.

The SMART Board and interactive media tool was created in Canada nearly 15 years ago. In England, however, a mandate has been created that SMART Boards should be installed in every classroom by 2009.

Toronto-based audio visual specialists Advanced Inc, held a workshop Peterborough, Ontario as part of their PD (Professional Development Series) showcase tour. The aim is to demonstrate the terrific benefits that the whiteboard technology offers as well as helping teachers there to navigate and overcome the learning curve.

One teacher commented, “I’ve certainly got rid of my chalk and chalk brush,” before adding, “it certainly makes the students more involved in the lesson, keeps their attention that much longer and I am able to also access the Internet and have it directly up on the screen – so it has been a great improvement in my program.”

Most teachers here are now using them on a regular basis. They say that over a period of 1-2 years, they end up stepping back from being the person that does the teaching to the students doing more of the work in the classroom. They become more of a guide, the students become experts and they become much more involved.

Whiteboards are used from kindergarten to secondaries and universities. The resources in the software allow you to make us of it with each of those different groups. On top of that, you can also make use of it with any software application that currently runs on your computer.

So, if you are teaching AutoCad to students at the secondary level you can use that, if you are teaching students to program using Java or C++, you can demonstrate, you can illustrate, and you can actually built it whilst you are standing here at the SMART Board because you can pull up that computer screen to work with it.

Join the whiteboard revolution with Advanced Inc.

The SMART Board interactive whiteboard is used to teach over 18 million students in more than 600,000 classrooms in more than 100 countries worldwide. If you want to know how you can join the SMART whiteboard revolution, contact Advanced Inc. now or call  (800) 436-6239.

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Halton Teachers Explore SMART Board Technology

Teachers are hoping their students will become more engaged in their education and less bored if they are taught in classrooms equipped with a radically different kind of blackboard — an interactive whiteboard. Several SMART Boards were recently on display in a room at the Burlington Holiday Inn as 200 teachers and school board administrators from Halton, Hamilton and the Niagara region attended a seminar on the electronic teaching technology.

The level of interest in the SMART Board on this day was well beyond the expectations of John Palbom, an educational technologies consultant and trainer with Advanced Presentation Solutions, a Mississauga-based company that sells the technology and conducts training and information sessions.

“We were expecting maybe 40-45 (teachers) and we’ve got 190 signed up,” said Palbom, who led the day’s demonstration of the SMART Board technology.

The SMART Board is described as a digital, interactive whiteboard. Using SMART Notebook software and a SMART Board attached to a floor stand, along with a data projector hooked up to a computer, teachers can quickly display, move or erase text or images on the 77-inch screen, as well as save, store and replay various aspects of classroom lessons.

The technology — a Calgary couple developed it and sold the first unit in 1991 — utilizes a touch-sensitive white screen that connects to a computer (PC or Mac) and a data projector. Computer applications can be controlled by touching the illuminated white display board with on-screen lessons highlighted via use of four-coloured digital ink (optical sensor) pens. For those who don’t want to use a pen, a hand-shaped pointer or even your finger can be used to touch or draw on the screen.

Some graphic elements can be copied and pasted or even written over top of. An Ink Aware system enables the user to insert text, handwriting or images to applications like Word, Excel and Power Point. The software allows access to 36 languages. Various keyboard configurations can be activated for writing text on the screen.

One Halton Catholic school board vice-principal is sold on the merits of the technology.

“I’ve heard about it but didn’t know enough about it. I want to learn more about so we can implement it in our schools,” Yolanda Esposito, vice-principal at St. Andrew elementary in Oakville, said about her reason for taking in the seminar.

Esposito said she would report her findings to her school and its school council. Cost is an issue, but she said they are interested in purchasing two of the SMART Boards for use as soon as the current school term.

Palbom asked for a show of hands to gauge teacher familiarity with the technology and about half of the 200 or so in the audience indicated they already use a SMART Board, with about half of that group saying they have had the board for anywhere from six months to two years.

Appleby College, a private high school in Oakville, has used interactive whiteboard technology in its classrooms for 10 years.

The seminar crowd consisted of teachers with 1-25 years or more of classroom experience.

“What I find really amazing is that the majority of teachers here are experienced ones. That says (to me) that good things are happening in education,” Palbom told the Post before the seminar, noting he would have expected a higher percentage of newer teachers to be more interested in the technology.

“The intent is that the students are in there manipulating the technology and interacting,” said Palbom.

Students can go up to the interactive whiteboard and use a digital pen or pointer.

In fact, the seminar began with a one-hour open period for teachers to get up close to the SMART Board and experiment with its touch features.

“At schools fortunate enough to have them, interactive whiteboards are a blessing for educators struggling to engage a generation of students weaned on the Internet,” said Palbom.

To get a deeper understanding of their students, a teacher can gauge their comprehension of a lesson or concept, and identify individuals in need, by using the Senteo interactive response system.

An optional product, the Senteo system uses a wireless hand-held device that looks like a cross between a calculator and an older model cellphone. Each student can be given one. A teacher can then pose questions or quiz students and get instant digital feedback about each child’s level of understanding and determine who needs more help.

Teachers can save digital files in various formats and even e-mail parts of lessons to students for them to review.

The area sales manager for SMART Technologies, which sells the SMART Board and its accessories, said the technology probably won’t completely replace the traditional classroom blackboard but that it can replace about 80-90 per cent of what is done on one and in a different way.

“It’s meant to be touched,” said Mike Ward. “Touch is a great way of learning.

“It’s a new medium for teachers. You can save daily lessons and e-mail them home to parents so you can see what your child’s doing from day to day.”

Ward said the British government is mandating that interactive whiteboards be in all its classrooms by 2009.

Education is the largest market for the SMART Board and related products, said Ward, but he noted the military and business sectors use it too, for presentations and personnel training.

Ward said Hockey Night in Canada TV analyst Kelly Hrudey will be using a SMART Board this hockey season to help make his points and that the CBC would be using one on election night.

As for cost, Ward said one SMART Board with a stand is about $1,450. A data projector ($700) and a computer (laptop or desktop unit) are necessary hardware and cost extra.

Optional items include a document camera ($800), which displays real-time or saved images or video on screen, and the Senteo classroom clickers, which cost about $2,000 for 32 of the student hand-held units.

If you want to explore the SMART Board and its related products, contact Advanced Inc. now or call  (800) 436-6239.

Source: The Burlington Post

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